Justice & Development in China

January 12 to April 20, 2017

4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Thursdays, LAW 3750 (Directions)

Photo by Benjamin van Rooij

Learn how law and society can shape media and freedom of speech, inequality, climate change, labor relations, corruption, agriculture and food production in China.

Prof. Benjamin van Rooij will lead the first part of the colloquium with support from notable UCI scholars, Wang Feng (Professor, Sociology), Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Chancellor's Professor, History) and Su Yang (Associate Professor, Sociology). 

The second half of the colloquium will be a series of workshops led by legal, history and social science experts on China from other universities, sharing papers on a range of topics like "Migration, Social Institutions, and Popular Resistance in Rural China" by Yao Lu (Columbia University) and "Critical Journalists and the Party: Reinventing Improvised Partnership" by Maria Repnikova (Georgia State University). These will be open to a wider audience; you can RSVP for these below.


Speakers

Yuen Yuen Ang

February 23: "Domestic Flying Geese: The Dynamics of Industrial Transfer in China"
Yuen Yuen Ang, University of Michigan

RSVP here

Yao Lu

March 9: "Migration, Social Institutions, and Popular Resistance in Rural China"
Yao Lu, Columbia University

RSVP here

Suzanne Scoggins

March 23: "Authoritarian Policing Under Xi"
Suzanne Scoggins, Clark University

RSVP here

Dorothy J. Solinger

March 30: "Modernization, Poverty, and Welfare: An Insidious Web"
Dorothy J. Solinger, UC Irvine

RSVP here

William Hurst

April 6: "The Rule of Law in China"
William Hurst, Northwestern University

RSVP here

Scott Wilson

April 13: "Impediments to Claiming Justice: A Comparison of HIV/AIDS Carriers' and Pollution Victims' Legal Complaints"
Scott Wilson, The University of the South

RSVP here

Maria Repnikova

April 20: "Critical Journalists and the Party: Reinventing Improvised Partnership"
Maria Repnikova, Georgia State University

RSVP here


Frequently Asked Questions

Who can take the colloquium?

It's open to all grad students.

What can I expect over the course of 14 weeks?

For the first half of the colloquium, you'll receive state-of-the-art introductions on China's recent political, legal and societal developments. In the second part of the colloquium students will participate in small workshops with leading experts from the U.S. actively discussing their latest research papers. 

How will you cover 'political, legal, and societal developments'?

Some of the key topics that will be in the colloquium include China's changing leadership policies, rule of law development and the functioning of courts and the legal profession, media and freedom of speech, inequality, population policy, social unrest, environment and climate change, labor relations, corruption, agriculture and food production.

How much credit will I earn?

You'll receive two semester units and 3 quarter units.

Will there be a final exam?

No, you'll be expected to turn in a paper. 

Who are the experts running the workshops?

By order of the schedule, you can expect to take workshops with the following historians, sociologists, and political scientists: Yao Lu (Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Columbia University); Suzanne Scoggins (Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Clark University); William Hurst (Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Northwestern University); Scott Wilson (Associate Dean for Global Education and Alfred W. Negley Professor of Politics at The University of the South); and Maria Repnikova (Assistant Professor in Global Communication at Georgia State University).

I'm not a law student. How do I register for the colloquium?

Non-law students wishing to take a law class must be hand-enrolled by the Law Registrar. Detailed instructions for graduate students wishing to take a law class can be found here. Students must complete a form and their home department must sign off on their registration. Once the form is received in our office with all signatures we can process the registration.

For more information, contact Christine Chiao at cchiao@law.uci.edu.